Google Shopping Campaigns: Overcoming Challenges

Moving away from PLAs and migrating to Shopping campaigns is one of the hottest topics in the PPC world this summer.  Google Shopping campaigns are designed to ease campaign management by allowing the creation of separate ad groups for the products an advertiser wants to bid on more aggressively. In addition, these new campaigns offer powerful reporting and competitive data such as benchmark CTR and CPC.  Although Shopping campaigns have these nice benefits, there are also challenges that advertisers need to consider, including:

Language Targeting

International advertisers who operate in countries like Switzerland with more than one native languages face a language targeting issue, as Shopping campaigns only allow an advertiser to target a country by domain. In Switzerland, for example, the campaigns would be targeting the .ch domain, but an advertiser cannot select which feed to show based on the user’s language. As a result, customers see both French and German ads.

There is a workaround suggested by one of the Googlers: First, for the Swedish example, an advertiser should create a unique feed for each language. For each feed, we want to use custom labels to specify the feed’s language, “German” or “French” in our case. The next step would be to set up a separate campaign for each language within the country and create a campaign level filter or a product group that targets that specific custom label.

 

Adding Negatives

New Google Shopping campaigns do not have the functionality in place where an account manager can add negatives directly from the search query reports. There are two ways to work around this issue. First, the advertisers can download the search query report, select the keywords that need to be added as negatives and add them back. The second, easier, way would be to use the account level view of the Keyword Tab, filter by campaign name or ad group and add the negatives from there.

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Bid Modifiers

Unlike previous campaigns, where geolocation and day-parting bid adjustments could be set at the ad group level, Google Shopping campaigns only allow to set bid modifiers at the campaign level. The challenge here is the inability/difficulty to set specific bids to the target audience.

Google Shopping For B2B E-Commerce Vendors

Overall, Google Shopping ads have a tendency to favor consumer products over B2B supplier products. But it does not mean that B2B vendors do not need to integrate their products into Google Shopping.  One thing to consider for B2B customers would be to become a Google Verified Supplier. The program is still in Beta and is currently limited to US.

In order to complete the certification process, the companies need to fill out an application and work with a Google representative. Once the process is completed and the company is a Google Verified Supplier, a Google Badge displays by the business name in the supplier area.
Trusted store logo

According to Google, having the badge helps increase customer trust, online visibility, and sales. Wayfair.com, an online retailer, reported an increase of 1.3% in conversions and a 0.9% lift in sales since becoming a trusted store through the program. Read more about the Google Trusted Store program.

Despite all the challenges and minor technical imperfections, we already migrated some of our PLAs to new campaigns and are excited to capitalize on the new opportunities offered by Google Shopping Campaigns.

 

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Comments:
  • Lisa Sanner
    Reply

    Hi Katya – Great breakout of some of the new GS challenges. Thanks for sharing these “workarounds.” 🙂

    So is the “workaround” for the campaign level bid modifier challenge, having a more broken out architecture, meaning more campaigns when you would have had them as ad groups as PLAs? Does that cause other issues other than just more campaigns to manage?

    July 23, 2014 at 8:03 am
  • Lisa Sanner
    Reply

    Hi Katya – Great breakout of some of the new GS challenges. Thanks for sharing these “workarounds.” 🙂

    So is the “workaround” for the campaign level bid modifier challenge, having a more broken out architecture, meaning more campaigns when you would have had them as ad groups as PLAs? Does that cause other issues other than just more campaigns to manage?

    July 23, 2014 at 8:03 am
  • Thank you for your question, Lisa!
    You are correct. At this point, the only way to overcome bid modifier challenge would be to have more granular architecture.
    We have not encountered any other issues other than more campaigns to handle.

    July 24, 2014 at 8:28 am

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